TheAveMagazine, Interview with ODBs mom, Cherry Jones

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News Stories - ODB

Just released in latest Issue of theavemagazine, Interview with ODBs mother, Cherry Jones

Rising Son
The hip-hop community was in shock when news hit that Russell “ODB” Jones had passed suddenly last November. But none of us were affected as much as his mother, Ms. Cherry Jones. We give the grieving mother a moment to say goodbye to her son... The hip-hop community was in shock when news hit that Russell “ODB” Jones had passed suddenly last November. But none of us were affected as much as his mother, Ms. Cherry Jones. We give the grieving mother a moment to say goodbye to her son.

Interview: Mark Allwood

Russell Jones was one of the most unique souls to have blessed this planet. Known to fans as Ol’ Dirty Bastard, ODB, Osirus, Big Baby Jesus, and a host of other aliases, he entertained millions with his unorthodox musical style. Sadly, the founding member of the Wu-Tang Clan passed away on November 13, 2004, just two days shy of his 36th birthday. While most people recall ODB as the wild man behind the 1995 album Return to the 36 Chambers: The Dirty Version, which produced hits like “Brooklyn Zoo” and “Shimmy Shimmy Ya,” his mother, Cherry Jones, remembers her son as a loving and caring person with a heart of gold. Despite numerous run-ins with police and well reported struggles with drug abuse, Ms. Jones wants the world to know that there’s more to “Rusty,” as she affectionately called him, than his public persona. He was a devoted father and son that many people never got to fully understand. Still dealing with the loss of her son, Ms. Jones takes a moment to discuss the tragically short life of Russell “ODB” Jones.

The Ave: First off, I would like to offer my sincere condolences on the loss of your son. How are you maintaining?
Cherry Jones: It’s not easy. It’s not easy at all, but I’m doing the best I can. I have seven children, so I_m out with my daughter practically every day. But there are so many reminders. Every time you pick up a magazine, he’s there.

I can only imagine. But in light of ODB’s passing, have you had time to reflect on his life and influence as an entertainer?
He was never famous to me. He was never famous to himself and never wanted to be. He was everyday people. That’s why he walked the streets of Brooklyn like it was home.


FOR THE FULL STORY UBSCRIBE TO THE AVE MAGAZINE at
http://www.theavemagazine.com/dept/subs.htm


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